Meteorology 400/800:  Weather Chart Analysis and Discussion

F 0810-1100
604 Thornton Hall

Fall 2009

Instructor: Dr. John Monteverdi, Professor of Meteorology
Office hours: MW 10-1100; T 1300-1400; or many hours by appointment
Office: 613 Thornton Hall
Phone: 338-7728
E-mail: montever@sfsu.edu

Last Updated Thu, December 17, 2009 2:00 PM

 

Prerequisites:
  • Metr 201 or equivalent* and consent of instructor; corequisite, Metr 460.
  • To obtain graduate (800) credit for this course, a student must be enrolled in the MS in Applied Geosciences AND/OR have consent of the instructor.

    * Equivalent courses may NOT be non-majors meteorology survey courses or labs.

 

 


Syllabus:

Includes course overview, goals, and assignment summary

Oakland 1E: Diagnosing Weather In Oakland

Student Membership in American Meteorological Society

Discussion Page

Lab Exercises

Exercise 1: Thermodynamic Diagrams: Plotting and Interpretation of a Simple Sounding (Marine Layer) (Resources)

Exercise 2: Thermodynamic Diagrams: Interpretation and Plotting of the Radiosonde Code (Midland Sounding)

Exercise 3-Part I: Basic Chart Analysis (Please review all pertinent information from Metr 200/201)

Exercise 3-Part II: Surface Observations (METARS) and Synoptic-scale Frontal Analysis (Please review all pertinent information from Metr 200/201) (Due 12/11/09)

Exercise 4: Temperature Advection

Exercise 5: West Coast Wave Cyclone (Due 12/14/09)

Exercise 6: Final Synthesis (Due 12/14/09)

Day of Class Presentations

November 20, 2009

November 6, 2009

October 30, 2009

October 16, 2009

October 9, 2009

September 25, 2009

Answer

Links

(Note: it is assumed that students have mastered the assignments in Meteorology 200/201)

WGSL Scripts

Metr 200/201 Assignments Page

Metr 200/201/400 Products Page

Class Day Resources:


Exercise 5

Friday 11 December 2009

Friday 4 December 2009

Reading: Vasquez, Weather Forecasting Handbook, pp.96-100; Vasqez, Weather Map Handhbook, pp. 93-104 (Numerical Weather Prediction)

Exercises 3 and 4

Friday 20 November 2009

Friday 13 November 2009

Weather Map Analysis

Frontal Analysis

Friday 6 November 2009

Friday 16 October 2009

Friday 9 October 2009

2 October 2009

Layer Sinking/Lifting:

Subsidence Inversion

  1. Activity -- Plot the the sounding of a 100 mb deep layer, with a temperature of -74 at 200 mb at its top, and -58 at 300 mb at its bottom.
  2. Activity -- Assume that synoptic scale sinking occurs....such that the whole column sinks 300 mb. Take the temperature at the bottom and follow a dry adiabat to 600 mb, and take hte temperature at the top and follow a dry adabat to 500 mb--connect the new points with a straight line...that is your transformed sounding.
  3. Activity -- What is the difference in stability for the two cases? (Estimate by taking a parcel at the bottom of each sounding and lifting it 100 mb...how much colder is it in the second case.
  4. Activity -- Now further make this slab sink, another 300 mb and repeat steps 2 and 3.
  5. Discuss: Layer sinking; Layer lofting
  6. Example: KOAK 1,VVEL, KOAK 2

Layer Lifting Creating Unstable Lapse Rate (with differential moisture characteristics)

  1. Activity -- Plot the the sounding of a 100 mb deep layer, with a temperature of 10C at 900 mb at its top, and 10C at 1000 mb at its bottom. Assume a moisture distribution that has saturated air at the bottom of the layer, and totally unsaturated air at the top.
  2. Activity -- Assume that synoptic scale lofting occurs....such that the whole column rises 600 mb. Take the temperature at the bottom and follow a wet adiabat to 400 mb and plot a point, and take the temperature at the top and follow a dry adabat to 300 mb--connect the new points with a straight line...that is your transformed sounding.
  3. Discuss.

Friday 25 September 2009

Friday 18 September 2009

Discussion Items:

Friday 11 September 2009

Friday 28 August 2009

Characteristics of Marine Layer Continued
Radiation vs Marine Inversions
Current Global Sea Surface Temperature Maps: Global SST and Anomalies
Chart Example


Note: Information Below Has Not Yet Been Organized for Fall 2009

Monday 24 September 2007

500 mb Chart

Read pp. 35-44; 57--59; 61-67; Appendix B

IDV bundle from Millersville

Monday 17 September 2007

Discussion Items: Oakland vs Minneapolis Summer Soundings: Look Alikes? and Satellite (9/17/07)

Layer Sinking/Lifting: (9/17/07)

  1. Activity -- Plot the the sounding of a 100 mb deep layer, with a temperature of -78 at 200 mb at its top, and -58 at 300 mb at its bottom.
  2. Activity -- Assume that synoptic scale sinking occurs....such that the whole column sinks 300 mb. Take the temperature at the bottom and follow a dry adiabat to 600 mb, and take hte temperature at the top and follow a dry adabat to 500 mb--connect the new points with a straight line...that is your transformed sounding.
  3. Activity -- What is the difference in stability for the two cases? (Estimate by taking a parcel at the bottom of each sounding and lifting it 100 mb...how much colder is it in the second case.
  4. Activity -- Now further make this slab sink, another 300 mb and repeat steps 2 and 3.

Sounding 1, Sounding 2

KOAK 1,VVEL, KOAK 2

 

For Lab 4:

Case Study

Simplified Vorticity Equation

Quasigeostrophic Equation: Height (pressure) Tendency and Omega Diagnosis


Source for Charts and Analysis

SPC charts
Analysis Example
Visualization

Exercise 3


Lab 4

Subsynoptic Analyses Examples: Outflow Boundary


Misanalyzed 500 mb Chart

What does this mean: "...the dynamics with the incoming system are weak..." --- Quasigeostrophic Equation: Height (pressure) Tendency and Omega Diagnosis

  • 201 Temperature Advection Handout and Example

    24 October. Each student will obtain each chart in the Synoptic Overview portion of the handout below for 12 UTC 24 October. On 24 October, I will tell you how each chart is to be prepred (drawn on/colors etc.) The reading in Chaston and Vasquez will help.

    Warm Core vs Not Warm Core (Thermal Low vs Dynamic Low)

    Basic Diagnostic Overview

    Thermal and Dynamic Pressure Systems from Metr 201

    Comments on Lab 1

    Handout from 201: Div/Conv Upper Waves

    10/3/05: "Anomalous" Cloud Lines: VIS 1 KM and 4 KM

    "...The most likely cause of the cloud lines stems from the exhaust of ocean going vessels. Large numbers of Aitken nuclei form in this exhaust. These are carried upward by the buoyancy of the hot gases and “ships air wake” to form droplets at slight supersaturation. The phenomenon does not appear related to special characteristics of the vessel's power plant but to a critical condition of the atmosphere. As far as is known, this condition may be described as having 1) a convectively unstable layer from the surface to a low-level stable layer, 2) saturation or slight supersaturation near the top of the convective layer, and 3) a convective layer, presumably deficient in cloud forming nuclei..."

    Katrina Radar 1 and 2 and Pressure Wind Trace and US Navy Tropical Cyclone page and Buoy Info

    Exercises 4 and 5

    December 10, 2007: nam_thick, nam_vort, QG-omega Diagnosis Table, Satellite

    nam_vort and nam_thick

    Diagnosing Divergence

    Quasigeostrophic Equations: Prognostic (Height Tendency) and Diagnostic (Omega)

    Exercises 3 Part I and Part II

    48 hr: 300 mb height, 300 mb conv, 300 mb vort advection, 500 mb vertical velocity

    48 h Nam thick, fronts, advection areas, frontal analysis, overlay

    264 h GFS Fcst: Surface Isobars, 500 mb, Advection Analysis, Fronts in Relation to Advection Analysis, Fronts

    Surface Isobars and Thickness; Surface Fronts from Thickness Field; 300 mb, Surface Thickness, Surface Thickness Areas, Surface Thickness Areas and Fronts

    Inclass Exercise 3

    Jet Stream

    Federal Meteorological Handbook Number 1

    Decoding METARS

    Current METARS

    Maps: Surface History, Surface Plot, Surface Plot with Present Weather Symbols Colored, 850 mb, 700 mb, 300 mb

    Maps: 850 mb (with fronts), 500 mb, and 300 mb